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20130420
20130420
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the policy of the united states since 9/11, including the bush administration, and the obama administration, for terror suspects apprehended within the united states to be treated in the federal system. there are two brief exceptions to that under the bush administration, even though two exceptions were treated in the civilian system. >> let me jump in. because senator graham was saying on fox just last night, or today, i'm fine with him getting tried in federal court. this is just about the initial designation. >> right. it's very difficult to actually designate somebody under the laws of war as an enemy combatant and not give them the rights and then try to drop them into the civilian system. you set yourself up when you do that. >> no -- >> let m point, jay. you set yourself up for all kinds of extensive challenges. there isn't a problem here. what you have i think is an enormous amount of public support right now for the job that law enforcement has done. and for senators who are not immediately involved in this thing, and many whom aren't even lawyers or been inside a court of law for
. on the issue of the obama administration, during the 2008 campaign, president obama criticized the bush administration's treatment of detainees. candidate obama promised to close guantanamo and to reject torture without exception or equivocation. he also criticized the previous administration for executive secrecy, included repeated invocation of the state's secret privilege to get civil lawsuits thrown out of court and the promise to lead a new era of openness. the administration has fulfilled some of those promises, and conspicuously failed to fulfill others. in some cases because congress has blocked them, but in other cases for reasons of their own. as asa mentioned earlier, high- level secrecy surrounding the rendition and torture of detainees since september 11 cannot continue to be justified on the basis of national security. the authorized enhanced techniques have been publicly disclosed and the c.i.a. has approved its former employee's publication of detailed accounts of individual interrogation. ongoing classification of material documenting these practices serves only to conc
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2

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